Wesley College Song Book - 1910
     Introduction      1893     1908     1910     1918     1924     1929     1937     1945     1952     1959     1968     1980     1989     2009  

The third edition of the songs introduced music and lyrics together for the first time published in 1910. The edition was a hardback one, with 2000 copies produced. The format of this edition closely resembles all subsequent hardcover editions. It is not dissimilar to the format in use by the renowned Harrow School in the United Kingdom. It was printed by the printer McCarron, Bird & Co. 479 Collins Street Melbourne.

A feature of this edition was the "lyrics-only" section in the final pages - entitled "Rhymes of the Times" - after the column of the same name in the newspaper "The Argus".

This edition of the Song Book featured six new songs added since the 1908 edition, taking the total to twenty-one songs.

A series of scans of the songbook, with the the school crest on the purple cover, is reproduced here. Click each page to enlarge it.

Cover Scan 1 Scan 2 Scan 3 Scan 4 Scan 5

The book in the College Archives has unfortunately been water-damaged. The inscription on the book's inner cover says "Louie Morrow", presumably a student.


The Flag Song

The Flag Song appears with lyrics unaltered from the 1908 version of the Song Book.

Words: Frank Samuel Williamson (1906).
Music: Lawrence Arthur Adamson
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



The Football Song

The Football Song appears with lyrics unaltered from the 1908 and 1893 versions of the Song Book.

Words: Lawrence Arthur Adamson (1893).
Music: "Marching through Georgia" by Henry Clay Work (1865)
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



The Boating Song

The Boating Song appears with lyrics altered marginally from the 1908 Song Book. This is the first Wesley version opening with the lyric "Glorious April Weather...". In the 1909 the Head of the River was moved to occur in May from the former October schedule. This was a direct swap with the athletics fixture which was moved to October from May.

Words: The Eton Boating Song by William Johnson
Music: Captain Algernon Drummond (1862)
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



The Best School of All

It's good to see the School we knew,
The land of youth and dream,
To greet again the rule we knew,
Before we took the stream,
Though long we've missed the sight of her,
Our hearts may not forget,
We've lost the old delight of her,
We'll keep her honour yet.

Chorus-
We'll honour yet the school we knew,
The best school of all,
We'll honour yet the rule we knew,
To the last bell call,
For working days, or holidays,
And glad or melancholy days,
They were great days and jolly days,
At the best school of all.

The stars and sounding vanities
That half the crowd bewitch,
What are they but inanities,
To him that treads the pitch?
And where's the wealth I'm wondering,
Could buy the cheers that roll
When the last charge goes thundering
Towards the twilight goal?

(repeat chorus)

To speak of fame a venture is,
There's little here can bide,
But we may face the centuries,
And dare the deepening tide;
For though the dust that's part of us,
To dust again be gone,
Yet here shall beat the heart of us-
The school we handed on!

Chorus-
We'll honour yet the school we knew,
The best school of all,
We'll honour yet the rule we knew,
To the last bell call,
For working days, or holidays,
And glad or melancholy days,
They were great days and jolly days,
At the best school of all.





History of "The Best School of All"

Words: Sir Henry Newbolt
Music: Lawrence Arthur Adamson (1907)
Arranged: Hermann Morris


The "Best School of All" appears for the first time in the Song Book. Adamson wrote a musical setting in 1907 for Sir Henry Newbolt's poem (1899), before Sir Hubert Parry wrote a tune for the lyrics in 1908. Clifton College in Bristol, UK is the source for the song. Sir Henry Newbolt conceived it initially as "The Old Cliftonian Song" in 1899. The tune for this song by Sir Hubert Parry was dedicated "for Harry Plunket Greene, Arthur Peppin and the Clifton boys". Harry Plunkett Greene was also a composer. Famous Clifton College alumni include Sir Henry Newbolt, actor Sir Michael Redgrave and comedian John Cleese. Sir Henry John Newbolt, CH (1862–1938) was an English poet and Minister of Information during the First World War. Sir Hubert Parry is famous for his setting of the hymn "Jerusalem", but did not attend Clifton College.


Sir Henry Newbolt

Sir Henry Newbolt was born on on 6 June 1862 in Bilston, Wolverhampton, then in Staffordshire, but now in the West Midlands, the son of the vicar of St Mary's Church, Rev. Henry Francis Newbolt, and his second wife, Emily. (In his biography, My World as in My Time, he claims to have been Jewish). After his father's death, the family moved to Walsall, where Henry was educated. He attended Queen Mary's Grammar School, Walsall, and Caistor Grammar School, from where he gained a scholarship to Clifton College, where he was head of the school (1881) and edited the school magazine. His contemporaries there included Douglas Haig, British Commander-in-Chief 1916-18. Graduating from Corpus Christi College, Oxford, Newbolt was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1887 and practised until 1899. He married Mraget Coltman. In 1914, Newbolt's only child, his daughter Celia, married Lt Col. Sir Ralph Furse (of the Furse Family of Devon). She died in 1975.

His first book was a novel, Taken from the Enemy (1892), and in 1895 he published a tragedy, Mordred; but it was the publication of his ballads, Admirals All (1897), that created his literary reputation. By far the best-known of these is "Vitai Lampada". They were followed by other volumes of stirring verse, including The Island Race (1898), The Sailing of the Long-ships (1902), Songs of the Sea (1904) and Songs of the Fleet (1910).

In 1914, Newbolt published Aladore, a fantasy novel about a bored but dutiful knight who abruptly abandons his estate and wealth to discover his heart's desire and woo a half-fae enchantress. It is a tale filled with allegories about the nature of youth, service, individuality and tradition. It was reissued in a limited and illustrated edition by Newcastle Publishing Company in 1975, as the new holders of the copyright.

Probably the best known of all Newbolt's poems and the one for which he is now chiefly remembered is Vitaï Lampada. It refers to how a future soldier learns stoicism in cricket matches in the famous Close at Clifton College. This poem was taught to students at Wesley. Rev. Denis Oakley, (OW1955) recalls the poem well and can still recite it to this day.



Schola Carissima

Schola Carissima appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1893 Song Book.

Words: Lawrence Arthur Adamson (1893)
Music: "Chanson Roland" (1066) as appearing in a text by Thomas Crotch (1816).

Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1893 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Grey Towers

Grey towers at night are keeping
Their watch o'er Wesley sleeping
Moonlight is softly creeping
From above.
Stars in the sky are shining
Their golden eyes divining
How close the Old School's twining
Round our hearts her love.

Chorus -
Old School! Our Alma Mater ever true!
Old School we'll fight for you
For you we'll die or do
The thought of you again our heart shall thrill
And rolling years shall guard
Your honour still.

Grey towers, so strong above us
Through life to fame will move us
But we, although you love us,
Soon must go.
May Fortune never slight you -
May all we do delight you
And sons of ours requite you
What they too will owe

Chorus.

And so, rough or calm weather
Old School, we'll hold together,
So strong the binding tether
Love has made
May lives of strong endeavour
Defend your honour ever
Our love for you can never,
Never, never fade.

Chorus.







History of "Grey Towers"

Words: Victor Upton Brown (OW)
Music: Unknown
Arranged: Hermann Morris


Grey Towers appears in the Song Book for the first time in 1910. A rather popular tune owing to its syncopated introduction, "oom-pahs" traditionally were added as vocal embellishments to the introduction. Occasionally students would alter the pronunciation for something a little more provocative, and receive the admonishment of the Music Master during school singing classes on a Friday.

The tempo for this tune was sped up for the arrangement released on the "Wesley Songs Millenium Edition" recording made in 2000, in order to add variety to the tempos of tracks on the CD. As a result, the tempo is now sung by students much faster than the gentle foxtrot known to students who learned the song prior to 2000s.

Much loved as a tune, "Grey Towers" is extremely well crafted musically, and was no doubt derived from a Ragtime two-step style of piece. Sadly, there is no credit for this Wesley Song Book tune, suggesting an exogenous source.



Tommy

Tommy appears as it did in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: Lawrence Arthur Adamson (1895)
Music: Harry Greenbank (1893) from the Musical "Gaiety Girl"
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Bow You're Hurrying

Bow You're Hurrying appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: Unknown
Music: "From the Cambridge Burlesque Aladdin" by H.J. Byron
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989 2009
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   





Vive La Compagnie


I come once again here to sing you this song
Vive La Compagnie!
You can give me a hint if you find it too long
Vive La Compagnie!

Chorus:
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour
Vive la, vive la, vive l'amour
Vive la reine, vive la roi
Vive La Compagnie!




History of "Vive La Compagnie"

Viva La Compagnie appears for the first time in the Song Book of 1910.

This song is basically a loose framework into which rhyming couplets are inserted. There are multiple versions published to date from outside Australia, and even the Wesley renditions have had different lyrics depending on which set of house tunes were sung. At Glen Waverley it was typically "Nicholas, Draper, Powell and Waugh", and at St Kilda Road it was "Adamson Corrigan Irving and Way". Dr. Tom Coates penned the house verses at one stage.

The song rates is known from 1844 as "Viva La Compagnie. Solo & Chorus As Sung by the Maryland Cadet's Glee Club" dating from 1844 . A piano score exists as a publication from Baltimore: F.D. Benteen, 137 Baltimore St., 1844. It was later reprinted by Miller and Beacham.



"Vive la Compagnie" is an old English song (bearing an 1818 date in Traditional Ballads Index)
The Bodleian Library has a 19th c. song called "Ireland Blocks the Wat," sung to the tune "Vive la Compagnie."

During the American Civil War, it was the tune for the Confederate song (1861), entitled "Chivalrous C. S. A." published by Francis D. Allan, 1874, "Allan's Lone Star ballads, A Collection of Southern Patriotic Songs Made During Confederate Times," Burt Franklin, NY.
It also was printed as a song sheet in Baltimore, Sept, 12, 1861

Surprisingly, the melody is not French in origin.

Words: Traditional, adapted to include Tom Coates' house verses.
Music: Traditional - dates from 1844 or earlier
Arranged: Hermann Morris


The Beaten Crew

The Beaten Crew appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: Adapted from W.H. Hudspeth
Music: W.H. Hudspeth
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Prep School Song

Prep School Song appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: L.A. Adamson and later amended by V. Upton Brown
Music: "Good Night" from "Plantation Songs" by Alfred Scott Gatty (1891)
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Old Collegians Song

Old Collegians Song appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: L.A. Adamson (1895)
Music: "Bonnie Blue Flag" Henry McCarthy (1861) and "Irish Jaunting Car" (traditional Irish)
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Founders' Day Song

Founders' Day Song appears with the same lyric as that appearing in the 1908 Song Book.

Words: Burnett Gray (1907)
Music: L.A. Adamson
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   





The New Boy

A new boy once to Wesley came
Resolved to add to his schoolboy fame
He swore to shine as a classic star
As he bade goodbye to his fond mama
As he bade goodbye to his fond mama
But it would not do
His scheme fell through
For the Master laughed at his Latin prose
And the boys wrote verses which provoked his curses
Till he groaned in the midst of all his woes
I don't know as much as my friends suppose.

He took to tennis and to football too,
And he tried for a place in a Wesley crew
Next term I'll turn to a "stew-pot" sort
He said with a kind of superior snort,
He said with a kind of superior snort
But it would not do
His scheme fell through
For he found that conversation light
Led to mild flirtation
Not matriculation
He thought it jolly but it was not right
For he went to the theatre Saturday night!

He bought wet towels and he purchased oil
And the lamps looked down on his midnight toil
But as he wrestled with an aching head
He found those blessed months had fled
He found those blessed months had fled
So it would not do
His scheme fell through
For his work was read by scholars keen
Who showed wonder
At each hopeless blunder
That they plucked him straight and they plucked him clean
The pluckiest plucked 'un ever seen!





History of "The New Boy"

The lyrics of "The New Boy" were written by William Charles Lewers from Trinity College in 1896. The music was composed in 1883 by none other than composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900) .




Will Lewers from Trinity College, circa 1885


Firstly, it is interesting to note the variation in style of "The New Boy" to the regular song book offerings. Will Lewers was obviously trying his hand at lyrics for some light operetta in the style of Gilbert and Sullivan, in this case basing his lyrics on a song by the character Lady Psyche "A Lady fair, of lineage high" from the second act of Gilbert and Sullivan's opera Princess Ida. Princess Ida is based upon a poem from 1870 by Alfred Tennyson called "The Princess". It is evident that while this style of music suits the solo voice, it would have been too difficult with a larger singing ensemble, owing to its irregular rhythms, unusual modulations, and its awkwardly placed pauses. Perhaps Adamson had experienced the piece first hand around the fireplaces of Trinity (from 1893-1897 Adamson was a resident tutor at Trinity College by night and taught at Wesley by day) and had become excited about the prospect of the entire school singing this style of material. Once attempted, there is no doubt that it would have been quickly abandoned. Perhaps "The New Boy" was included specifically for a solo by a proficient vocalist at assembly, perhaps to indeed welcome "The New Boy". Lewers was a scholar of words, having graduated with degrees in Arts and Law. Adamson was admitted to the Bar in 1886. Below is the Trinity College Song written by Will Lewers and Felix Cowle for the old students' dinner April 1888, in Lewer's hand, set to a truncated verse and full chorus of the tune "Funiculi Funicula".




Trinity College Song, April 1888, by W. Lewers

There is a memorial plaque to William Lewers, dated 1927, in the Trinity College Chapel at Melbourne University.



A Lady Fair of Lineage High (lyrics W.S. Gilbert)

Lady Psyche:
A Lady fair, of lineage high,
Was loved by an Ape, in the days gone by.
The Maid was radiant as the sun,
The Ape was a most unsightly one,
The Ape was a most unsightly one
So it would not do
His scheme fell through,
For the Maid, when his love took formal shape,
Express'd such terror
At his monstrous error,
That he stammer'd an apology and made his 'scape,

With a view to rise in the social scale,
He shaved his bristles and he docked his tail,
He grew mustachios, and he took his tub,
And he paid a guinea to a toilet club,
He paid a guinea to a toilet club
But it would not do,
The scheme fell through
For the Maid was Beauty's fairest Queen,
With golden tresses,
Like a real princess's,
While the Ape, despite his razor keen,
Was the apiest Ape that ever was seen!

He bought white ties, and he bought dress suits,
He crammed his feet into bright tight boots
And to start in life on a brand new plan,
He christen'd himself Darwinian Man!
He christen'd himself Darwinian Man!
But it would not do,
The scheme fell through
For the Maiden fair, whom the monkey crav'd,
Was a radiant Being,
With a brain farseeing
While Darwinian Man, though well-behav'd,
At best is only a monkey shav'd!
Hilarion, Cyril & Florian:
For the Maiden fair, whom the monkey crav'd,
All:
Was a radiant Being,
With a brain farseeing
While Darwinian Man, though well-behav'd,
At best is only a monkey shav'd!



Harry Rover

There's a chap that Wesley's known for many a day
We mostly call him "Harry" just for short
He can run a bit and jump a longish way
But at football he's a quintessential snort
He's a ducky he's a daisy he's a trick
He's an injia-rubber idiot on a stick
It would take a double eighteen for to lick
Little "Harry" when he's going strong and free!

CHORUS
Here's to you Harry Rover
It's your loss that we deplore
You have stayed with us your longest
And you can't stay any more
Now that playing time is over
And we've got to part with you
Here's a health to Harry Rover
And a health to Wesley too

He couldn't pull an oar for half a mile
At cricket we've no use for him at all
But we must certify his skill and style
At the Winter Game in handling the ball
When he's hopping in and out among the ruck
With that squidgy squirmy run they learn to fear
A happy day with "Harry" on his luck
Will last the stoutest foeman for a year!

CHORUS





History of "Harry Rover"

Harry Rover appears for the first time in 1910.
Words: L. A. Adamson (based loosely on Rudyard Kipling's "Fuzzy Wuzzy")
Music: S. Potter Song "Private Tommy Atkins" from the musical "Gaiety Girl"
Arranged: Hermann Morris


The fact that both "Tommy" and "Harry Rover" derived their music from the one musical means that the source is indisputable. However, the material here is not (at least on paper) as strong as some of the other songs in the song book from this period.

"Private Tommy Atkins" sheet music : Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4

This is an awkward tune for massed voices and solo piano accompaniment. Being a march, with its arpeggiated fanfare interludes, this song better suits solo voice and an ensemble including drums. The footnote in the Wesley Song Book suggests "This song was originally written and sung in honour of J.H. Prout on his leaving the school at midwinter 1907. Since then the name of the song has been retained and the words may be altered when necessary to suit any special occasion". Prout had been awarded gained his school colours in football as a 15 year old after only two games with Collegians, as a schoolboy, in 1902. He was hailed as "probably the most brilliant footballer the Public Schools have ever had", according to Laurie Humphries' history of the Collegians Football Club. Noble's Auction House at one point had listed in a catalogue one of Prout's medals dated 1902 for the Under 16 220 yards dash.

Doing the mathematics Prout would have been 20 years old in 1907 when this song was written upon his leaving school. After such a protracted tenure, the need for a celebratory song would be more than justified, even one as awkward to sing as "Harry Rover".

The "Here's to you" lyric is common to Kipling and to "Harry Rover". It is curious that there are two sources - the Kipling poem and the Potter song from the musical. Usually song writers with limited ability to write a song lyric of their own will replace an existing lyric line for line from an existing song, preserving the meter. Another possibility is that Adamson passed his lyric to Hermann Morris to find a suitable tune, and Morris opted for "Tommy Atkins" which he then transcribed. The reason for omitting the composer credit is unknown.

It is important to distinguish "J. H. Prout" from "J.A. Prout" who scored 459 runs against a Geelong College cricket team in 1909.



PRIVATE TOMMY ATKINS - lyrics Henry Hamilton, music S. Potter, from "A Gaiety Girl" (1893)

Oh, we take him from the city or the plough
And we drill him and we dress him up so neat.
We teach him to uphold his manly brow
And how to walk and where to put his feet.
It doesn't matter who he was before,
Or what his parents fancied for his name,
Once he's pocketed the shilling
and a uniform he's filling
We call him Tommy Atkins all the same.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.

In time of peace he hears the bugle call,
In barracks from "Revally" to "Lights Out,"
And if "Sentry go" and pipe-clay ever pall,
There's always plenty more of work about.
On leave o' nights you meet him in the streets
As happy as a schoolboy and as gay,
Then back he goes to duty,
all for England, home and beauty,
And the noble sum of thirteen-pence a day!
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.

In war-time then it's Tommy to the front,
And we ship him off in Troopers to the scene;
We sit at home while Tommy bears the brunt,
A-fighting for his country and his Queen.
And whether he's on India's coral strand,
Or pouring out his blood in the Soudan,
To keep our flag a-flying,
he's a-doing and a-dying,
Ev'ry inch of him a soldier and a man!
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.

So Tommy dear, we'll back you 'gainst the world
For fighting or for funning or for work,
Wherever Britain's banner is unfurl'd
To do your best and never, never shirk.
We keep the warmest corner in our hearts,
For you, my lad, wherever you may be,
By Union Jack above you!
but we're pround of you and love you,
God keep you, Tommy, still by land and sea.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.
Oh! Tommy, Tommy Atkins
you're a "good 'un" heart and hand,
You're a credit to your calling
and to all your native land,
May your luck be never failing,
May your Love be ever true,
God bless you, Tommy Atkins,
Here's your Country's love to you.



FUZZY WUZZY - a poem by Rudyard Kipling

We've fought with many men acrost the seas,
An' some of 'em was brave an' some was not:
The Paythan an' the Zulu an' Burmese;
But the Fuzzy was the finest o' the lot.
We never got a ha'porth's change of 'im:
'E squatted in the scrub an' 'ocked our 'orses,
'E cut our sentries up at Sua"kim",
An' 'e played the cat an' banjo with our forces.
So 'ere's "to" you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your 'ome in the Soudan;
You're a pore benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man;
We gives you your certificate, an' if you want it signed
We'll come an' 'ave a romp with you whenever you're inclined.

We took our chanst among the Khyber 'ills,
The Boers knocked us silly at a mile,
The Burman give us Irriwaddy chills,
An' a Zulu "impi" dished us up in style:
But all we ever got from such as they
Was pop to what the Fuzzy made us swaller;
We 'eld our bloomin' own, the papers say,
But man for man the Fuzzy knocked us 'oller.
Then 'ere's "to" you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, an' the missis and the kid;
Our orders was to break you, an' of course we went an' did.
We sloshed you with Martinis, an' it wasn't 'ardly fair;
But for all the odds agin' you, Fuzzy-Wuz, you broke the square.

'E 'asn't got no papers of 'is own,
'E 'asn't got no medals nor rewards,
So we must certify the skill 'e's shown
In usin' of 'is long two-'anded swords:
When 'e's 'oppin' in an' out among the bush
With 'is coffin-'eaded shield an' shovel-spear,
An 'appy day with Fuzzy on the rush
Will last an 'ealthy Tommy for a year.
So 'ere's "to" you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, an' your friends which are no more,
If we 'adn't lost some messmates we would 'elp you to deplore;
But give an' take's the gospel, an' we'll call the bargain fair,
For if you 'ave lost more than us, you crumpled up the square!

'E rushes at the smoke when we let drive,
An', before we know, 'e's 'ackin' at our 'ead;
'E's all 'ot sand an' ginger when alive,
An' 'e's generally shammin' when 'e's dead.
'E's a daisy, 'e's a ducky, 'e's a lamb!
'E's a injia-rubber idiot on the spree,
'E's the on'y thing that doesn't give a damn
For a Regiment o' British Infantree!
So 'ere's "to" you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your 'ome in the Soudan;
You're a pore benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man;
An' 'ere's "to" you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, with your 'ayrick 'ead of 'air --
You big black boundin' beggar -- for you broke a British square!



Johnny and Billy

Johnny, Johnny, I've been thinking
Thinking very deeply too
That when songs are sung at Wesley
Personalities are few

Billy, Billy, I've been thinking
That if what you say is true
I shall have to sing in whispers
When I'm singing songs with you




History of "Johnny and Billy"

Words: Uncredited
Music: Uncredited
Arranged: Uncredited

Every history turns up some works that raise more questions than are answered. This song, hopelessly short, is structured like a vaudeville "patter", complete with "til ready" bars preceding the vocal entry and the structure runs to a simple vamp. "Johnny and Billy" was most likely to be a framework to include recently composed rhyming couplets, in the same vein as "Vive la Compagnie". Should a song be required, perhaps on a topical matter, or perhaps on a special occasion, a simple song framework such as "Johnny and Billy" could be employed. The idea of a "spontaneous" song, actually prepared in advance, is common in busking circles, and in vaudeville. This song appears for the first time in 1910.


Land of Our Birth


Land of our birth, we pledge to thee
our love and toil in the years to be,
when we are grown and take our place
as men and women with our race.

Father in heaven, who lovest all,
O help thy children when they call,
that they may build from age to age
an undefiled heritage.

Teach us to bear the yoke in youth,
with steadfastness and careful truth,
that, in our time, thy grace may give
the truth whereby the nations live.

Teach us to rule ourselves alway,
controlled and cleanly night and day,
that we may bring, if need arise,
no maimed or worthless sacrifice.

[Teach us to look in all our ends,
on thee for Judge, and not our friends,
that we, with thee, may walk uncowed
by fear or favor of the crowd.]

[Teach us the strength that cannot seek,
by deed or thought, to hurt the weak,
that, under thee, we may possess
man's strength to comfort man's distress.]

Teach us delight in simple things,
and mirth that has no bitter springs,
forgiveness free of evil done,
and love to all men 'neath the sun.

Land of our birth, our faith, our pride,
for whose dear sake our fathers died;
O Motherland, we pledge to thee
head, heart and hand through the years to be.




History of "Land of Our Birth"

Words: Rudyard Kipling, 1906
Music: Hymn tune "Galilee" by Philip Armes in "Hymns Ancient and Modern" 1861, reprinted 1875.
Arranged: Philip Armes


Land of Our Birth appears for the first time in the Song Book of 1910. The bracketed verses at left from the original poem were omitted in the song book. If there was ever any doubt that Kipling was in heavy usage in education from 1900 onwards, let that doubt be now dispelled. Doctor Philip Armes' tune features a rather interesting and brief modulation to the subdominant in the third line of the stanza.


Philip Armes


Philip Armes (b. August 15, 1836 Norwich UK - d. February 10, 1908, Durham, UK) wrote the tune used here - entitled "Galilee" (sharing its title with several other hymn tunes of the same name)

Armes was an Oxford graduate (MusB 1848, MusD 1864). He was a chorister under Zechariah Buck at Norwich, and at Rochester Cathedral, under J. L. Hopkins. He went on to serve as organist at Trinity Church, Milton, Gravesend (1854); St. Andrew’s, Wells Street (1857); Chichester Cathedral (1861); and Durham Cathedral (1861-1907). He was also a Professor of Music at Durham University (1897).



The Leaving Song


First appeared in the 1893 Song Book
Words: Lawrence Arthur Adamson
Music:Traditional ("Radoo")
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1893 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   



Dulce Domum


First appeared in the 1893 Song Book
Words: Frank Goldstraw
Music: John Reading (The Winchester School) before 1695
Arranged: Hermann Morris
Editions: 1893 1908 1910 1918 1924 1929 1937 1945 1952 1959 1968 1980 1989 s
Downloads: MID NWC SIB PDF TXT JPG
Viewers: NWC Viewer NWC Mozilla Plug-in SIB Scorch IE plugin
   

© 2008 State of the Art Systems.   All rights reserved.  Programmed by State of the Art Systems.